Week in Geek 1.2.15

Week in Geek – a roundup of science, technology and pop culture news with commentary each Friday

2014 Annual report

The closeout of the year brought along many changes in the world at large and for me personally. Several of those changes occurred right here. The Long Shot got a brand-new look, and WordPress added new formats for creating posts and viewing stats. They also provided an artfully-done 2014 Year in Blogging Report that you can check out yourself if you’re so inclined.

Highlights of the report, for me anyway, included an analogy between The Long Shot and a New York City subway train that holds 1200 people and would need to make six trips in order to carry all the people who visited the site this past year.

Not surprising at all was the fact that my busiest day by a huge margin was just a few weeks ago on Dec. 13 when Week in Geek got Stuckmannized – also the most viewed post of the year. i’d like to think it was due to my sublime writing skills, but really it’s because the fella i interviewed has an enormous following and graciously helped promote the article. That being said, writing narrative interviews is my favorite kind of post to work on and going into 2015 i hope to do more of those. i’ve got a few of those in the pipe, including one that the TOS fan in me is geeking out about already.

Worth mentioning though are some other notable posts from the year. One of them is a prime example of how important SEO is to generating traffic, and the other is exciting because it comes from a contributing writer, something i hope to see a lot more of in 2015 and beyond.

CWRU at CES 2015

It seems that i’m starting to make at least a little bit of a name for myself in the Cleveland technology scene, as a press release came to my desk a few weeks ago from Bob Sopko, director of Blackstone LaunchPad at Case Western Reserve University.

Bob was excited to let me know that he, along with students and alumni from CWRU, would be showcasing their inventions and entrepreneurship at the 2015 International Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Jan. 6-9.

Nine teams will travel to the exhibition that draws over 150,000 visitors from around the world, with two of the teams making a return visit after introducing their concepts at last year’s show.

One of the returning teams is Everykey, the brainchild of CWRU students that is a Bluetooth-enabled wristband which stores the ever-increasing number of passwords we use throughout the day with our smartphones, tablets and computers. Further developments will enable the stylish accessory to grant access to physically locked items like doors, cars and bike locks as well as plans to integrate other systems like home lighting.

everykey

Everykey wristband in one of seven available colors

“Everykey removes the stress and hassle of losing keys and forgetting passwords, while providing even better security than what consumers currently have in place,” Christopher Wentz, CEO of Everykey and 2013 CWRU grad, said. “Our product uses military grade encryption, allowing only you access to your personal property and accounts. Like a credit card, you can instantly disable your Everykey if it ever gets lost or stolen.”

On their website right now, you can preorder your own Everykey for $25 less than the retail price, which is only a modest $100 to begin with. The device works with Windows, Mac OS, Linux, Android and iOS as well as Chrome, Firefox and Safari. The rechargeable battery life holds an impressive 30 day charge, and the device itself is water-resistant, with Bluetooth Low Energy and a customizable range up to three meters.

Everykey originated in an entrepreneurship class taught by Walt Sokira at CWRU in 2012. Sokira was so impressed by the idea that he invested capital in the project. Since then, Everykey has been well-regarded in publications like The Wall Street Journal, TechCrunch and Digital Trends.

The Kickstarter for Everykey shows that they surpassed their $100,000 goal and funding is now closed. The tiered rewards for pledging included some impressive stuff from regular access to all updates, an Everykey developer circuit board and early access to Everykey SDK all the way up to an exclusive visit to their office to have their chief designer create a custom Everykey wristband for you. Most backers pledged in the $50 range, which netted them an Everykey at half price, with planned shipping in March 2015.

This to me is another example of some of the fantastic technology innovations coming out of my hometown. Everykey is definitely something i’m putting on my wishlist, especially since more and more, accounts prompt you to change your password so often – i can’t remember them all!

The other returning team is Carbon Origins, a CWRU student technology think-tank focused on solving hard technical problems in electronics and aerospace. Their first product – Apollo – is a tiny embedded sensor development board capable of measuring and recording temperature, pressure, humidity, ultraviolet, infrared and visible light, audio intensity, three-axis accelerometer, gyroscope and magnetometer and GPS.

Data gleaned through Apollo was originally used after a rocket crashed, and scientists strove to learn the reason why. Like most innovations, this singular use was expanded upon and has found a home in applications ranging from robotics and drones to wearable computing devices.

Apollo is about as big as your thumb, with a trackball control and 128 x 64 pixel 0.96″ OLED screen and is equipped with an onboard microphone for audio recording and streaming.

The Apollo device from Carbon Origins

The Apollo device from Carbon Origins

The remaining teams traveling to CES 2015 have varying goals for their presentations, like high-tech home maintenance, health monitoring, aviation and rocketeering, or to use the latest manufacturing technology to make high quality toys less expensive.

All of the projects are supported by think[box] – CWRU’s center for innovation that provides space, equipment and training. Anyone is invited to use their resources to tinker and creatively invent, but especially CWRU students, faculty and alumni. Right now, think[box] is housed in 4500 square foot space but $35 million in renovations are in the works for a 7-story, 50,000 square foot facility to make one of the largest university-based innovation centers in the world.

“Think[box] is where our students and faculty can, on their own, take those ideas in their heads and get them in their hands – that is, to actually go from concept to prototype,” Jeffrey Duerk, dean of the Case School of Engineering, said.

Blackstone LaunchPad also helped teams through mentorship of their startups and development, assisting in securing funding and taking ideas to market.

“We look forward to our expanded involvement in the world’s largest display of innovation and discovery,” Bob Sopko said. “As a major research institution, we will be involved for our second year in a row, expanding from two to six booths (between 75427 and 75437 Tech West, Sands Expo, Level 2). Our students and alumni are excited to be demonstrating, selling and actively looking for partnerships.”

Last year, the Case School of Engineering was the only university organization exclusively showcasing student startups at CES, and now in their second year attending the expo, CWRU is tripling its presence.

Remaining teams that will be at CES 2015 are:

  • SpiroSano, which helps patients with respiratory conditions, such as asthma, COPD or cystic fibrosis, track their activities and episodes around the clock and share that data with their doctor to improve treatment. Doctor and patient create and control a personalized disease management toolkit using SpiroSpano’s platform.
  • Doppler Yoyo, one of several competition-grade and collectors-grade yo-yos Spartan Yoyo Works creates using 3-D printing at a fraction of the standard production price. The yo-yo is made of a single material and achieves a high moment of inertia by changing the geometry in ways that would be impossible without 3-D printing.
  • Event 38 Unmanned Systems, which designs and builds mission-specific, unmanned fixed-wing and multirotor aircraft systems and optical sensors as well as drone data post-processing solutions. Event 38 systems are used primarily in agriculture and surveying.
  • 360×360 Selfie Stick, patented in 2012 by CWRU alumnus Joshua Wang, of Taiwan. With a telescoping handle and a camera bracket that can swivel in any direction, the stick provides the distance to take “selfies” of large groups or to provide different angles or more background in photographs. The stick can also be used to take photos over walls, around corners and in hard-to-reach places.
  • Hema Imaging LLC, which helps homeowners and professionals use thermal, or “heat map,” imaging to uncover unexpected temperatures associated with common household problems, such as faulty circuit breakers, sealing losses or ductwork and water leakage. The HemaVision helps homeowners identify and diagnose problems by automatically highlighting abnormal temperatures, locking onto scenes, calculating power dissipation and cost, and making statistical maps of significant temperature changes.
  • And last but not least, you may remember this Cleveland tech innovator from Week in Geek a few weeks ago – BoxCast, a company that has developed a plug-and-play broadcast box, within the display of Osmisys, an electrical engineering technology firm. The Boxcast product allows anyone with a camera to conveniently stream standard and high-definition live video to the company’s cloud-based service for retrieval at any time and from any location.

To stay up-to-date with these creative innovators and their presentations at CES 2015, like CWRU’s Blackstone LaunchPad on Facebook, follow @LaunchPadCWRU on Twitter and keep an eye on #CES2015.

You can be sure i’ll follow up with as many of these folks as I can after CES wraps.

Code Retreat

Beginning coders and experienced alike are invited to sign up for the Post CodeMash v2.0.1.5 Coderetreat on Jan. 11 from 8:30 a.m. until 5 p.m. at the LeanDog Software Boat in Cleveland. LeanDog is the sponsor for the event.

Coderetreat is an intensive practice event focused on software development and design fundamentals. Co-facilitators Charlotte Chang and Carl Shotwell bill the event as an opportunity to get away from the pressures of ‘getting things done,’ noting that the format has shown to be an effective way to improve skills. Developers can improve their ability to write code that minimized the cost of change over time, by practicing basic principles of modular and object-oriented design according to the event’s description.

There’s no specific coding language required, so attendees can work in their preferred language setup. Event organizers do ask for open-mindedness though, with the possibility of experimenting with other languages.

In addition to sharpening your coding skills, Coderetreat is a great place to hone your social skills too, and get introduced to peers.

Expertise as a coder, developer or programmer is also not a requirement. Beginning programmers are welcome, but are asked to have a basic understanding and skill – the event is about coding after all. It is an opportunity to learn lessons and values for everyone including experts. If you’re an experienced coder or thinking about getting into it, this Coderetreat is an excellent opportunity to expand your skills and pick up new ones, so check it out!

Thankfully i’ve been plugging away at Codecademy so i think i qualify for the “basic understanding” part of it. If you attend, stop and say hello – i’d love to hear from you! i’ll be the guy who barely knows what he’s doing.

Learning to code

Speaking of Codecademy, i’ve earned 8 badges and 41 points so far, although i have yet to fully complete a skillset (i’m 85% done with the first one though).

My recent experiences there are worthy of their own post, which i’ll work on during the next couple of days. Imagine that – more than one post in a week! In the meantime, check out a couple of the 30-minute exercises i worked on. Still haven’t discovered a way to embed the work directly into a post, so you’ll have to just follow the links:

  • Sun, Earth and Code – simple animation work (although you wouldn’t think so from the amount of lines of code!
  • Earth and Moon – variation on the above using cooler images

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Thanks for reading the tenth (!!) Week in Geek in addition to visiting The Long Shot. Of course, there were many more exciting things that happened in the world of science, technology and pop culture this week…but these were the ones that most caught my attention. If you have any news you’d like to share, drop me a line and let me know – i try to keep up with stuff but i can’t read everything!

If you would like some further reading, about some science and technology stuff that happened this week, here’s a few links i hope you find as interesting as i did. Naturally, there’s several year-in-review and looking-ahead sorts of articles to start the list, and beyond that some useful tips, intriguing experiments and…drama from the world of hi-technology?!

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Follow @longshotist on Twitter for frequent shares of related articles and (hopefully) humorous nonsequiters.

Week in Geek will be back next Friday, Jan. 9 and i’d love to see you here!

Remember – if you would like to contribute to The Long Shot, i’d be happy to make that happen!

Week in Geek also appears alongside other great blogs at The News-Herald Blogs (click the logo at the top right of the page for the main site).

Thanks for reading!

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